Methods and Analysis

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Module Handbook
Module Title:
Problem Solving: Methods and
Analysis
Module Code:
FE5056QA
Module Leader:
Julian Barnes
Session: 2021/22
Teaching period: Summer – (QAHE July 21 intake)
Pre-requisites: None
Weblearn URL:
https://student.londonmet.ac.uk/weblearn/
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Welcome to FE5056QA Problem Solving: Methods and Analysis
Session 2021/22
Module Booklet Contents
1. Teaching team……………………………………………………………………….. 3
2. Module Summary and Description…………………………………………….. 3
Module Learning Outcomes……………………………………………………. 3
Module Syllabus/Content……………………………………………………….. 4
3. Indicative weekly teaching programme………………………………………. 5
4. Attendance and Absence…………………………………………………………. 6
5. Academic Integrity and Plagiarism…………………………………………….. 7
6. Assessment…………………………………………………………………………… 8
7. Module Specification ………………………………………………………………. 9

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1. Teaching team
Details of staff teaching on the module

Name Role Office Email
Julian Barnes Module
Leader
Office:
Birmingham
[email protected]
Kenneth Ibhaluobe Tutor London [email protected]
Tapiwa Padenga Tutor Manchester [email protected]
Mustafa Rashid Tutor Manchester [email protected]
Maxwell Olokundun Tutor Manchester [email protected]
Raymond Adu Tutor Birmingham [email protected]

2. Module Summary and Description
The module will be delivered over a 12-week period and consists of 1.5 hours
lectures and 1.5 hours seminar each week.
This module aims to develop students’ ability to understand and apply problem
solving methods and analysis in relation to issues that may arise in business and
management subject areas.
The module offers an opportunity for students to collect, present, analyse and
interpret qualitative and quantitative data from a variety of data sources. It seeks
to enhance students’ knowledge and understanding of the business environment
and develop their data management and data analysis skills using IT packages as
appropriate.
The module provides the quantitative and qualitative data analysis skills that
underpin the success of an empirical research project. This module helps to build
the sound foundation required to undertake a final year project / dissertation
module.
Module Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:
1. Identify problems and issues that may arise in business and management
subject areas, and formulate empirical research questions. (LO1)
2. Critically examine and apply qualitative and quantitative methods and

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techniques for understanding and addressing research problems and
questions. (LO2)
3. Collect and analyse qualitative and quantitative data in a subject context, and
appropriately interpret and report results and findings using relevant IT
packages. (LO3)
Module Syllabus/Content
Identification of problems that may arise in business and management subject
areas.
Refinement of issues for investigation, and formulation of empirical research
questions.
Problem-solving approaches and philosophical perspectives: positivism, realism,
pragmatism and interpretivism.
Distinction between deductive, inductive and abductive approaches
Formulation of epistemological, ontological and axiological positions
Problem Solving Methodological Choice: quantitative methods, qualitative
methods, multiple/mixed methods
Choosing research strategies: Experiment, Case Study, Survey, Grounded
Theory, Archival Research, Ethnography, Action Research, Narrative Inquiry
Describing data types: secondary data and primary data
Primary data sources such as observation, surveys, interviews
Secondary data sources such as indices, economic indicators, ONS
Data sampling and data collection methods
Analysing qualitative and quantitative data: content/documentary analysis,
thematic analysis; time series analysis, cross-sectional analysis, panel analysis,
case study analysis, regression analysis
Using tables, charts, graphs, diagrams and statistics
Using IT packages such as Excel and SPSS.
Data interpretation, making inferences and reporting results
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3. Indicative weekly teaching programme
The indicative weekly programme shows the topic likely to be covered in each teaching
week, please note that the precise order can change. Check your Weblearn module for
up to date information.
To view the time, date and location of class see your personal timetable available at
https://ttportalqalive.com/2122/studentlogin.html

Teaching Week
(Week
Commencing)
Topic
Week 01
(25/July/2022)
Identification of problems that may arise in
business and management subject areas
Saunders et al (2019)
– Chapter 2
Week 02
(01/Aug/2022)
Problem-solving approaches and
philosophical perspectives
Saunders et al (2019)
– Chapter 4
Week 03
(08/Aug/2022)
Review of literature Saunders et al (2019) – Chapter 3
Week 04
(15/Aug/2022)
Formulating research design Saunders et al (2019) – Chapter 5
Week 05
(22/Aug/2022)
Describing data types and data collection
techniques
Saunders et al (2019)
– Chapter 12
Week 06
(29/Aug/2022)
Data sampling methods Saunders et al (2019) – Chapter 7
(05/Sept/2022) Reading week
Week 07
(12/Sept/2022)
Qualitative data analysis Saunders et al (2019) – Chapter 13
Week 08
(19/Sept/2022)
Quantitative data analysis using excel Saunders et al (2019) – Chapter 1
Week 09
(26/Sept/2022)
Quantitative data analysis using SPSS /
Jamovi
Saunders et al (2019)
– Chapter 12
Week 10
(03/Oct/2022)
Writing and presenting research Saunders et al (2019)
– Chapter 14
Week 11
(10/Oct/2022)
Revision
Week 12
(17/Oct/2022)
Revision and Formative feedback
Week 14
(31/Oct/2022)
Assessment due 31st October

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To pass the module you must achieve an overall minimum mark of
40%. If you pass the module on re-assessment, the component you
resit will be capped at a pass mark level of 40%
Core Textbook:
Saunders, M., Lewis, P. and Thornhill, A. (2019). Research Methods for Business
Students
, 8th ed., Pearson Education Limited. [This is an E-BOOK]
Additional Textbooks:
Bradley, T. (2013). Essential mathematics for economics and business, 3rd ed., John
Wiley & Sons Ltd.
Creswell, J.W. and Creswell, J.D. (2018).
Research Design: Qualitative,
Quantitative, and Mixed Methods Approaches.
Sage.
Denzin, N. and Lincoln, Y. (2017).
The SAGE Handbook of Qualitative Research.
Sage. [Earlier E-BOOK is available]
Jacques, I. (2018).
Mathematics for economics and business, 9th ed., Pearson. [This
is an E-BOOK]
Oakshott, L. (2016).
Essential quantitative methods for business, management and
finance
, 6th ed., Palgrave Macmillan. [This is an E-Book]
Swift, L. and Piff, S. (2014).
Quantitative methods for business, management and
finance
, 4th ed., Palgrave-Macmillan. [This is an E-BOOK]
4. Attendance and Absence
Students studying at QAHE will be subject to the QAHE Student Attendance and
Engagement policy. You will be required to agree to abide with these policies during
enrolment for your programme at the QAHE Centre. Copies of the policy are available
in paper format from Student Services.
Studies have shown that a good attendance record has a positive impact on
performance and therefore is an important factor in helping you to fulfil your academic
potential. If your attendance is unsatisfactory, we will review your complete record.
You are expected to attend all scheduled classes and prescribed activities. Otherwise
you may not achieve the learning outcomes for your modules and could be ineligible
for formal assessment in some of them.

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It is your responsibility to ensure that your attendance fulfils the published attendance
requirements as set by QAHE.
If you are aware that you will not be able to attend your scheduled class, please email
[email protected] and inform them of your absence and the reasons for your
absence. Non-attendance will have implications for your visa and student loan (for
example, your visa or student loan could be revoked) and could, ultimately, result in
the possibility of you being withdrawn from the course.
QAHE recognises that you may need to undertake part time employment to support
your studies and may have other commitments such as childcare or family or religious
events. However, QAHE does expect you to fit these commitments around timetabled
sessions in order to take part in the course fully. If you are aware of an event (for
example, unexpected work commitments or a religious holiday) that is going to disrupt
your attendance at taught sessions you should discuss this with your lecturer and
inform
[email protected]
5. Academic Integrity and Plagiarism
Academic integrity requires honesty in your studies. You should not present another
person’s sentences or ideas as your own work. You should clearly identify quotations
through the use of quotation marks and references to the sources. Failure to adhere
to these academic standards may lead to allegations of Academic Misconduct, which
will be investigated by the Student Casework Office.
Academic Misconduct covers a variety of practices, such as:
Plagiarism: copying another person’s ideas or words and presenting them as
your own work, without the use of quotation marks and/or references;
Self-plagiarism: resubmitting, in part, or in entirety one of your assignments for
another piece of work; Inventing, altering or falsifying the results of experiments
or research;
Commissioning or contracting another person to complete an assessment;
Colluding with others in the production of a piece of assessed work which is
presented as entirely your own work;

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Cheating in an exam (for example, but not limited to taking revision notes into
the exam room or copying off another student during an exam).
For full details of Academic Misconduct and how allegations are investigated, see the
relevant section of the University’s academic regulations:
https://student.londonmet.ac.uk/your-studies/student-administration/rules-andregulations/academic-misconduct/.
6. Assessment
All assessments are designed to support your learning and help you develop a
deeper understanding of the topics covered in your module.
Formative assessments provide an opportunity to learn and do not contribute
to your grade.
Summative assessments contribute to your overall mark and grades.
Module Assessments (Summative)

Assessment
Method
Description of Item weighting % Week Due If not pass on
aggregate, explain
what is required to pass
the module
Coursework Individual Coursework
– 2000 words
100% 14
(31
st
October)

Module Assessment Cycle
The module assessment cycle shows all assessment related activities of your module.

Week Activity
Week 3 You will be informed about the summative assignment
details and assessment criteria
Week 12 Formative Assessment feedback
Week 14
31st October
Summative Assessment Submission:
You will submit the summative assignment – individual
coursework in week 14. Summative assessment contributes
to your overall mark and grades.

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7. Module Specification
https://intranet.londonmet.ac.uk/module-catalogue/record.cfm?msid=15EB6516-
6A2A-46FD-84606C8F04B56482
GSBL UNDERGRADUATE GENERAL GRADE DESCRIPTORS

General Level 3/4
o Acquisition of
broad knowledge
o Evaluate
information
o Use information to
plan, develop and
problem solve
Level 5
o Generate ideas
through analysing
concepts
o Demonstrate a
command of
specialised skills
o Formulate
responses to well
defined and
abstract
o Analyse and
evaluate
information
Level 6
o Critically review,
consolidate and
extend a body of
knowledge using
specialised skills
o Critically evaluate
concepts and
evidence from a
range of sources
o Transfer and apply
skills and exercise
significant
judgement in a
range of situations
70-100
(A)
Very good
Demonstration of very
good comprehension of
the task with evidence
of analysis, synthesis,
evaluation and critical
appraisal
Use of a wide variety of
appropriate sources
Transformation of
knowledge
Independent thinking
and development of
ideas
Ability to communication
very clearly and
effectively
Very good evidence of
preparation
Very good organisation,
structure and
presentation of work –
minimal errors
Good references,
appropriate sources
(quality and quantity).
No errors in reference
list or citations.
Excellent
Advanced scholarship
Goes beyond the
material provided
Excellent link to
research
Excellent analysis,
synthesis, evaluation
and critical appraisal
Excellent evidence of
preparation
Comprehensive and
critical understanding of
the topic
Excellent ability to
communicate clearly
and effectively
Excellent organisation,
structure and
presentation of work
Good references,
appropriate sources
(quality and quantity).
No errors in reference
list or citations.
Excellent – Outstanding
(for use at far end of
range)
Outstanding
understanding,
exploration and insight
Strong evidence of
originality and
development of own
ideas
Develop a highly
complex argument
Outstanding ability to
communicate topics
clearly and concisely
Advanced organisation,
structure and
presentation of work
Good references,
appropriate sources
(quality and quantity).
No errors in reference
list or citations.
References well utilised
and critiqued

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60-69
(B)
Very good
Demonstration of very
good comprehension of
the task with evidence
of analysis, synthesis,
evaluation
Use of a wide variety of
appropriate sources
Transformation of
knowledge
Independent thinking
and development of
ideas
Ability to communication
clearly and effectively
Very good evidence of
preparation
Very good organisation,
structure and
presentation of work –
minimal errors
Good references,
appropriate sources
(quality and quantity).
Minimal or no errors in
reference list or
citations.
Very good
Demonstration of very
good comprehension of
the task with evidence
of analysis, synthesis,
evaluation
Use of a wide variety of
appropriate sources
Transformation of
knowledge
Independent thinking
and development of
ideas
Ability to communication
clearly and effectively
Very good evidence of
preparation
Very good organisation,
structure and
presentation of work –
minimal errors
Good references,
appropriate sources
(quality and quantity).
Minimal or no errors in
reference list or
citations.
Very Good
Advanced scholarship
Goes beyond the
material provided
Very good link to
research
Very good analysis,
synthesis, evaluation
and critical appraisal
Very good evidence of
preparation
Comprehensive and
critical understanding of
the topic
Very good ability to
communicate clearly
and effectively
Very good organisation,
structure and
presentation of work
Good references,
appropriate sources
(quality and quantity).
No errors in reference
list or citations.
50-59
(C)
Adequate – Satisfactory
Some analysis but
limited
Some insight and
exploration of ideas
Sound conclusions
No significant
inaccuracies or
omissions
Some analysis,
evaluation or synthesis
of information
Lacking clarity at times
Some evidence of
preparation
Referencing is sound.
Mostly appropriate
sources. Numerous
errors or inconsistencies
Adequate – Satisfactory
Some evidence of
thinking independently
to develop own ideas
Evaluation of relevant
theories or literature
Reasonable ability to
communicate clearly
and effectively
Report information in a
structured way
Use of an appropriate
format
Quite comprehensive
knowledge
Satisfactory evidence of
preparation
Satisfactory referencing,
appropriate sources.
Numerous but minor
errors in references
Adequate- Satisfactory
Evidence of thinking
independently to
develop own ideas
Evaluation of relevant
theories or literature
Ability to communicate
clearly and effectively
Report information in a
structured way
Use of an appropriate
format
Reasonably Accurate,
quite comprehensive
knowledge
Satisfactory evidence of
preparation
Coherent and well
presented – minor
errors
Satisfactory referencing,
appropriate sources.
Minor errors in
references

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40-49
(D)
All learning outcomes
met
Competent (practical)
May be incomplete in
knowledge (some errors
or omissions)
Insufficient analysis,
evaluation or synthesis
Limited application of
theories/knowledge
An awareness of
appropriate
principles/theories/techn
iques
Irrelevance to the task
at times
Disorganised work with
weak standard of
presentation
Numerous aberrations
from the requirements of
the task
Referencing is
attempted although may
be inconsistent, many
errors, weak sources
All learning outcomes
met
Competent (practical)
May be incomplete in
knowledge (some errors
or omissions)
Weak or no analysis,
evaluation or synthesis
Some application of
theories/knowledge
An awareness of
appropriate
principles/theories/techn
iques
Irrelevance to the task
at times
Disorganised work with
weak standard of
presentation
Aberrations from the
requirements of the task
Referencing is
attempted although may
be inconsistent, many
errors, weak sources
All learning outcomes
met
Competent (practical)
May be incomplete in
knowledge (some errors
or omissions)
Weak or no analysis,
evaluation or synthesis
Some application of
theories/knowledge
An awareness of
appropriate
principles/theories/techn
iques
Irrelevance to the task
at times
Disorganised work with
weak standard of
presentation
Aberrations from the
requirements of the task
Referencing is
attempted although may
be inconsistent, many
errors, weak sources
Condon
ed Pass
30-39
(F1)
Learning outcomes not
met
Little relevant
knowledge
Lacking structure
Numerous errors in
structure and form
Limited understanding
of concepts/theories
No appropriate analysis,
evaluation or synthesis
Significant
inaccuracies/omissions
Not competent
Little or no attempt to
use references and if so
very weak with errors
Learning outcomes not
met
Little relevant
knowledge
Lacking structure
Numerous errors in
structure and form
Limited understanding
of concepts/theories
No appropriate analysis,
evaluation or synthesis
Significant
inaccuracies/omissions
Not competent
Little or no attempt to
use references and if so
very weak with errors
Learning outcomes not
met
Little relevant
knowledge
Lacking structure
Numerous errors in
structure and form
Limited understanding
of concepts/theories
No appropriate analysis,
evaluation or synthesis
Significant
inaccuracies/omissions
Not competent
Little or no attempt to
use references and if so
very weak with errors
Under
30 (F2)
Little engagement with
the task
No basic understanding
of the subject matter
Poor communication
(written or verbal)
Lacking or no structure
Little engagement with
the task
No basic understanding
of the subject matter
Poor communication
(written or verbal)
Lacking or no structure
Little engagement with
the task
No basic understanding
of the subject matter
Poor communication
(written or verbal)
Lacking or no structure

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Significant errors in
structure and form
Many significant
inaccuracies/omissions
– very little correct
Little or no attempt to
use references and if so
very weak with many
significant errors
Significant errors in
structure and form
Many significant
inaccuracies/omissions
– very little correct
Little or no attempt to
use references and if so
very weak with many
significant errors
Significant errors in
structure and form
Many significant
inaccuracies/omissions
– very little correct
Little or no attempt to
use references and if so
very weak with many
significant errors
(0%) No submission
Nothing of relevance in
the work submitted
No submission
Nothing of relevance in
the work submitted
No submission
Nothing of relevance in
the work submitted