EPE510 ASSESSMENTS

College of Education

EPE510 ASSESSMENTS

Assignment 1 Report
Title Critical analysis of learning design.
Value Pass Ungraded
Week Due Monday Week 7
Length 3,500 words
Learning Outcomes 1,2,5,6
Task: Design a 20-30-minute assessment task to gather baseline data on a precisely anticipated group of diverse
students (a year level within EC, Primary or Secondary stages of schooling.) Present a detailed and persuasive
rationale that justifies the professional decisions made in this design with critical reference to the professional
and theoretical literature.
For additional support in deconstructing the expectations for this assignment see Module 3 Topic 2 for mini
lecture.
Part 1: Design an Assessment Activity (approx. 2 pages or 1,500 words):
In brief: This is not a lesson plan but a detailed description of the activity itself: the ways in which students will
engage in it and the teacher will use it to gather a range of data about the students’ current levels of learning in
a particular area.
Expanded description: Imagine you are undertaking a new topic of learning with your class. You have some
understanding of their learning capacities generally, and of their literacy and numeracy levels. You need to
understand their various learning levels in the new topic so that your program design will achieve measurable
impact on the learning of all students. Create an engaging ‘profiling’ assessment activity that you would use in
the first lesson of this topic to determine their learning levels. The activity may also involve some ‘new’ learning,
but its primary aim is to allow you to gather assessment data.
Evaluate, select and apply suitable assessment and other pedagogical strategies to ensure that the assessment
data gathered is fair, reliable and valid, and that students are engaged.
Tip: Part 1 needs to have very clear and precise description of the activity, assessment and pedagogical
strategies.
Part 2: Justify your Design Choices (approx. 4 pages or 2,000 words):
Write a coherent and persuasive rationale for your assessment design that identifies the ways in which your
design demonstrates your understanding of the philosophical and professional contexts in which it is situated,
the principles and practices of planning for learning and assessment, and your capacity to engage in reflective
and ethical practice.
Support your claims with reference to the relevant literature relating to core and discipline specific pedagogical
issues, policies and practices.
Tip: this is where you explicitly demonstrate your professional knowledge in relation to the learning outcomes of
this unit (LO 1,2,5,6).
Structure and Content of Assignment
Please follow these guidelines and use the structures provided
Part 1: Design of Learning Activity (3 pages, 1,500 words)
Present your design in a grid to maximise efficient use of space/words. Include all the sections shown below.
Focus most on detailed descriptions of the student cohort and of the assessment activity.
Overview of Learning Program (Unit of work) and Student Cohort (half page/500 words)Year level: Topic/Theme: Curriculum Learning Area/s: Length of program / unit
of work:Description of Student Cohort (approx. 500 words):
Tip: Although this is an imagined class, you will need to describe the relevant factors to be considered when
designing the learning for the overall unit of work. Avoid generic demographics. Be as vivid and detailed as
possible for several students. See descriptions in the set text for examples.Overview of Learning and Assessment for Program / Unit:
Curriculum Content Descriptions:
For example: Yr 7 English/Literature/Literature and context (ACELT1619) Identify and explore ideas and
viewpoints about events, issues and characters represented in texts drawn from different historical, social
and cultural contexts (etc)
Learning Intentions (objectives) of the unit of work:
For example: Students are learning to Describe the . . . Demonstrate how to . . . Evaluate . . . (etc)
Success Criteria (assessment):
Tip: these are the measurable indicators of students’ learning
For example: Students will Create a poster that . . . Contribute to a discussion to decide . . . (etc)Overview of Assessment Activity Sequence
Tip: If you gave this to another teacher would they be able to get a general sense of the learning design to
achieve the intentions?
Learning Focus/ Objectives Learning Activities/Resources etc1 2 3 4Profiling Activity (1 and a half pages/1,000 words)Learning Activity: Topic: Curriculum Content Description:Learning Intentions: Students are learning
To . . . How . . . Why . . . When . . .Success Criteria: Students can
Identify . . . Solve . . . Demonstrate . . .Description of Learning Activity following lesson design principles (several paragraphs)
Tip: Make this as clear, precise and descriptive as possible If you gave this to another teacher would they be
able to get a general sense of the learning design to achieve the intentions?
Part 2: Justification of Design Choices (4 pages/2,000 words)
Present your justification as an analytical argument in essay form. Include at least 1-2 in-text citations in each
paragraph to support your argument. Many of your citations will be of Duchesne and McMaugh (2016), Clarke
& Pittaway (2014) and additional e-readings or further readings. Your reference list should have a minimum of
5 texts cited, including Duchesne and McMaugh (2016). These texts will include some from the unit readings
and some you have researched yourself.
Tip: You are arguing and persuading the reader that your choices are professional defensible and supported by
the literature you have engaged with and the balanced judgement you have made of the student cohort.
Follow the structure below:
A: Context and Introduction (1/2 page, 1 paragraph)
Explain why you chose the theme/topic for the cohort described.
Describe the philosophical contexts on which you have drawn for your overall learning design for this cohort
and topic, and explain why. Specifically identify any ethical implications of your selected philosophy and how
you would manage these. (Week 1 Content)
B: Learning Activity Design Choices – Part 1 Learning goals (1-3 paragraphs)
Explain the choices you made about the assessment activity design process in relation to lesson planning
principles and processes, developing appropriate learning goals, and the use of the learning management plan
to guide your activity design. Include here information about the designing and resourcing of engaging learning
activities and materials as well. (Week 2 and 3 Content)
Tip: the emphasis here is on the choice of learning goals
C: Learning Activity Design Choices- Part 2 Model of learning design (1-3 paragraphs)
Explain the choices you made about the assessment planning process and models used. Here you will need to
refer specifically to how you utilised backwards planning processes. You will also need to identify the model
you drew on to develop your activity, either Blooms Taxonomy, SOLO Taxonomy, or Dimensions of learning,
and specifically discuss how you used one of these models to structure the learning and assessment design.
(Week 5 Content)
Tip: the emphasis here is on the choice of model/s to scaffold your learning design for backwards mapping
D: Learning Activity Design Choices- Part 3 Assessment design (1-3 paragraphs)
Explain the choices you made about the assessment activity design process in relation to the principles,
purposes and forms of assessment. You will need to specifically identify how your assessment design adheres
to the principals of assessment, the purpose of your assessment activity, the form of assessment that your
activity takes, and how you will collect and report on the assessment data. (Week 4 Content)
Tip: the emphasis here is on the choice of assessment process against the principles of assessment
E: Learning Activity Design – Part 4 Reflection (1-2 paragraphs)
Explain how you will use reflection to evaluate your assessment design. You will also need to consider how you
will do this in the context of your professional experience placement in relation to working with your mentors
and working with parents. Make links here to how you will use the concept of ‘doing it resiliently’ to support
your planning and evaluative process.
Tip: emphasise how will you apply resilience and critical reflection about undertaking this design activity during
your professional experience
F: Reference List
Min 5 texts (including Duchesne and McMaugh)
G: Appendices (optional and not included in the word count)
You may wish to include examples of resources used in the learning activity here to give the reader a
fuller picture of this activity.

ASSESSMENT 1 MARKING CRITERIA

Marking Criteria Fail Pass Credit Distinction High Distinction
Design of profiling activity and
description of anticipated
context and cohort is detailed
and specific
Lack of detail in design and
context and cohort description is
scant or missing
Some detail in design and
description of cohort and
context
Effective, if inconsistent level of
detail in design and description of
cohort and context
Design and description of
cohort and context is
detailed and occasionally
vivid in the ‘picture’ it
presents
Design and description of
cohort and context is
detailed and vivid in the
‘picture’ it presents
Design of profiling activity is
engaging and appropriate to
anticipated context, cohort
and curriculum
Design unlikely to engage
students and rarely responds to
needs of cohort, context and
curriculum.
Design shows some
success in engaging
students and responding
to needs of cohort, context
and curriculum
Design is broadly successful in
engaging students and
responding to needs of cohort,
context and curriculum
Design is effectively engages
students and responds to
needs to cohort, context and
curriculum
Design is highly effective in
engaging students and
responding to the needs of
the cohort, context and
curriculum
Design of profiling activity
synthesises a range of
appropriate strategies to
ensure fairness, validity and
reliability of data gathered
(principles of assessment)
Strategies limited in range or non
existent; principles of assessment
rarely considered
Some strategies
incorporated in attempt to
adhere to principles of
assessment
Sound but limited range of
strategies incorporated that lead
to adherence to most principles
of assessment
Effective range of strategies
incorporated that lead to
adherence to all principles
of assessment
Comprehensive range of
strategies synthesised to
ensure all principles of
assessment are clearly
adhered to.
Rationale identifies ways the
assessment design
demonstrates understanding
of contexts, principles and
practices of learning and
assessment planning and
reflective and ethical practices
Rationale fails to identify more
than a small number of ways
Rationale identifies a
limited number of
superficial ways
Rationale identifies a sound range
of ways
Rationale identifies an
extensive range of ways
Rationale identifies a
comprehensive range of
ways
Rationale is supported by
relevant literature relating to
core and discipline specific
pedagogical issues, policies
and practices.
Reference to relevant literature is
limited or non-existent
Limited reference list.
Limited range of citations
in text. Limited evidence
of research undertaken
Reference to sound range of
relevant literature used to
support claims
Effective range of references
to relevant literature used to
support claims
Synthesis of extensive
range of relevant
references, showing depth
of analysis and resulting in
a persuasive rationale
Writing is of professional and
academic standard and uses APA
6th Ed. style.
Repetitive grammatical errors suggest
the need to seek assistance to
improve writing and editing skills:
contact [email protected] for
writing support. Ideas need to be
more carefully organised, or more
careful word choice is needed.
Referencing and/or research skills
require development.
Minor grammatical errors,
distracting at times
Ideas are clearly
communicated
APA referencing is good but
inconsistent in places.
Few grammatical errors
Ideas are clearly and concisely
communicated
APA referencing is accurate
Few grammatical errors
Ideas are clearly, concisely and
persuasively communicated
APA referencing is accurate
Few grammatical errors
Ideas are clearly, concisely
and persuasively
communicated
APA referencing is accurate

Education
Education in context: Preparation for Practice and Assessment 6
CDU GRADUATE ATTRIBUTES
CDU graduate attributes refer to those skills, qualities and understandings that should be acquired by
students during their time at the University regardless of their discipline of study. (See
http://www.cdu.edu.au/learning-teaching/graduate-attributes).
RESOURCES
Required set text
Duchesne, S. & McMaugh, A. (2016). Educational Psychology for Learning and Teaching (5th Ed.).
Sth Melbourne: Cengage.
Required textbooks can be ordered from the CDU Bookshop through their website at
www.cdu.edu.au/bookshop
Further Reading
Akbari, R. (2007). Reflections on reflection: A critical appraisal of reflective practices in L2 teacher
Arthur, L. Beecher, B., Death, E., Docket, S. & Farmer, S. (2012). Assessing and planning for children’s
learning, in Programming and planning in early childhood settings. South Melbourne: Cengage Press.
Argyris, C. and Schön, D. (1974) Theory in practice: Increasing professional effectiveness, San Francisco:
Jossey-Bass Atherton, J. (1999). Resistance to Learning: a discussion based on participants in in-service
professional training programs, Journal of Vocational Education and Training 51(1).
Bellanca, J, Fogarty, R, Pete, B. (2012). How to teach thinking skills within the Australian Curriculum.
Moorabbin, Vic: Hawker Brownlow Education.
Berwick, K. (2010). Programming: a working example. In Pearson Australia custom book, Professional
knowledge, practice and commitment: Engaging the profession. Frenchs Forest NSW: Pearson Australia.
(pp 217-227 Ch 12)
Bolton, G. (2014). Reflective Practice: Writing and Professional Development. London: SAGE
Brady, L. & Kennedy, K. (2012). Celebrating Student Achievement: Assessment and Reporting. Frenchs Forest,
NSW: Pearson.
Bruner, J. (1996). The Culture of Education. Cambridge, MA:Harvard University Press.
Cowley, S. (2010). Getting the Buggers to Behave (4th ed.). London: Continuum International. Ch 2
Darling-Hammond, L. (1999). Reshaping teacher policy, preparation and practice: Influences on the National
Board for Teaching Professional Standards. Washington, DC: AACTE Publications
Dewey, J. (1929). The quest for certainity: A study of the relation of knowledge and action. New York:
Monton, Balch & Co.
Education
Education in context: Preparation for Practice and Assessment 7
Dixon, M., Ferguson, P., Hay, T., Moss, J., & White, J. (2004). Moving your story forward: Frameworks for
thinking about learning and teaching. In M. Dixon, R. English, P. Ferguson, S. Godinho, T. Hay, L.
Longaretti. J. Moss., F. Sanjakdar, J. White & J. Wilson, Invitations and Inspirations: Pathways to
successful teaching (pp 12-29). Carlton South, Vic: Curriculum Corporation.
Dyson, M., Plunkett, M., & McCluskey, K. (2015). Success in Professional Experience: Building relationships.
Melbourne: Cambridge
Edwards, B. (1995). Drawing on the artist within: A guide to innovation, invention, imagination and creativity.
London: HarperCollins. pp102-111 Ch 9
Ewing, R. (2010). Curriculum and Assessment: A narrative approach. South Melbourne: Oxford
Ewing, R., Lowrie, T., & Higgs, J. (2010). Teaching and Communicating: rethinking Professional Experiences.
South Melbourne: Oxford.
Frangenheim, E. (2012) Reflections on classroom thinking strategies: Practical strategies to encourage
thinking in your classroom (10th ed.)Loganholme, QLD: Rodin Educational Consultancy, pp. 36-71
Glasson, T. (2009). Improving student achievement: A practical guide to assessment for learning. Carlton
South VIC: Curriculum Corporation. Ch 3 pp 38-52
Griffin, P. (Ed) (2014). Assessment for Teaching. Pt Melbourne: Cambridge.
Griffiths, M. (1994). Autobiography, feminism and the practice of action research. Educational Action
Research, 2(1), 71-82
Groundwater-Smith, S., & Mockler, N. (2009). Teacher professional learning in an age of compliance: Mind
the gap. Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands.
Hall, A. (2011). Teachers and professional ethics. In D. Fraser & C. McGee (Eds.), The Professional Practice of
Teaching 4th Ed. (pp 266-289). South Melbourne, Victoria: Cengage Learning.
Harpaz, Y. (2005). Teaching and learning in a community of thinking. Journal of Curriculum and Supervision
20(2). Retrieved March 9 2014 from http://yoramharpaz.com/pubs/en_learning/teaching-learning.pdf
Hattie, J. (2012). Visible Learning for Teachers: Maximising impact on learning. Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge.
Kagan, D. (1992). Professional growth among preservice and beginning teachers. Review of Educational
Research 62(2), 129-169
Killen, R. (2007). Effective Teaching Strategies: Lessons from Research and practice. Sth Melbourne: Cengage
Korthagen, F. A. J. (1993). Two Modes of Reflection. Teacher and Teacher Education, 9(3), p317-326.
Lynch, D., Smith, R & Doe, T. (2007). The design and execution of learning experiences: The learning
management plan. In R. Smith, D. Lynch & B. Knight, Learning Management: Transitioning teachers for
national and international change. Frenchs Forest NSW: Pearson Australia. Ch 9McLachlan, C., Fleer, M.
& Edwards, S. (2012). Assessing children and evaluating curriculum: Shifting lenses, in Early Childhood
Curriculum: Planning, Assessment and implementation. Cambridge University Press.
Education
Education in context: Preparation for Practice and Assessment 8
Marzano, R.J. & Pickering, D.J. (1997). Dimensions of Learning: Teacher’s manual. Alexandria. Association for
Supervision and Curriculum Development.
Marzano, R. (2005). A different kind of classroom: teaching with dimensions of learning. Alexandria VA:
Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Ch 2
Marzano, R. (2007). The art and science of teaching. Alexandria VA: Association for Supervision and
Curriculum Development. Ch 10
Nottingham, J (2013). Encouraging learning: How you can help children learn. Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge.
Ch 7
Petty, G. What’s this learning journal all about? Retrieved March 9 from http://geoffpetty.com/searchresults/?q=journal&cx=000888210889775888983%3A3gepro1fol8&ie=UTF-8&sa=Search
Pollard, A. (2008). Reflective Teaching (3rd ed.). London: Continuum International. Ch 1
Richardson, S. (2010). From novice to Learning Manager. In B.A. Knight & D. Lynch, Applied Learning
Management: Approaches for the new millennium. (pp7-21). Frenchs Forest NSW: Pearson Australia.
Ridden, P. (2011). For those who teach. Camberwell, VIC: ACER Press. (pp 13-29 Ch 3
Schon, D. (1987). Educating the reflecting practitioner: Toward a new design for teaching and learning in the
professions. San Fransisco: Jossey-Bass
Sellars, M. (2014). Reflective Practices for Teachers. London: Sage.
Silver, H.F., Strong, R.W. & Perini, M.J. (2007). The strategic teacher: selecting the right research-based
strategy for every lesson. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.
(pp45-55 Ch2)
Stuart, C., and Thurlow, D. (2000). Making it their own: Preservice teachers’ experiences, beliefs and
classroom practice, Journal of Teacher Education, 51: 113
Smith, K. (2008). How to be an explorer of the world: Portable life museum. London: Penguin, pp 4-11.
Stronge, J.H. (2002). Qualities of effective teachers. Alexandria VA: Association for Supervision and
Curriculum Development. Ch 7
Tanase, M., and Wang, J. (2010). Initial epistemological beliefs and transformation in one teacher education
classroom: case study of four preservice teachers, Teaching and Teacher Education 26, 1238-1248.
Wentzel, K. (2014). Motivating students to learn (4th ed.). New York: Routledge. Ch 1
Education
Education in context: Preparation for Practice and Assessment 9
Recommended education websites
It is important to understand the larger context in which ‘education’ in Australia occurs. Collectively the
websites listed below provide insights into policy and practice across the complete range of formal education
contexts in Australia, from early childhood through to secondary schooling.

Australian Children’s Education and Care
Quality Authority
http://www.acecqa.gov.au/
Australian Curriculum http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/
Australian Curriculum Assessment and
Reporting Authority
http://www.acara.edu.au/default.asp
Australian Curriculum Assessment and
Reporting Authority: My School
http://www.myschool.edu.au/
Australian Government Department of
Education: Early Childhood
https://education.gov.au/early-childhood
Australian Institute for Teaching and
School Leadership (AITSL)
http://www.aitsl.edu.au/
Belonging, Being and Becoming: The
Early Years Learning framework
https://docs.education.gov.au/system/files/doc/other/belonging_bein
g_and_becoming_the_early_years_learning_framework_for_australia.
pdf
Designing Early Childhood Australia:
Planning, PD and Provocation
http://designingearlychildhoodeducationau.blogspot.com.au/
Early Childhood Australia: Code of Ethics http://www.earlychildhoodaustralia.org.au/
Early Childhood Intervention Australia http://www.ecia-nsw.org.au/
Early Childhood Resource Hub http://www.ecrh.edu.au/
Kids Matter www.kidsmatter.edu.au
National Assessment Program. NAPLAN http://www.nap.edu.au/default.aspx
Northern Territory Early Childhood
Australia
http://www.earlychildhoodaustralia.org.au/state-territory
branches/nt/
Queensland Government. Early
Childhood Education and Care
http://deta.qld.gov.au/earlychildhood/
Department of Education, WA. (2013).
Success for all: Selecting appropriate
learning strategies. Retrieved January 5,
2018
http://det.wa.edu.au/stepsresources/detcms/cms
service/download/asset/?asset_id=13952416
Look especially at:
• pp 1-7: a planning framework – a sensible and straightforward
approach to avoid getting overwhelmed by strategy/activity choice.
• pp 14-15 marking keys – great for specific learning objectives broken
down from broader area.
My Child https://www.mychild.gov.au/

Education
Education in context: Preparation for Practice and Assessment 10

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *