6CC546 – Database Fundamentals

Assessment Brief (Academic Year 2019-20)
6CC546 – Database Fundamentals
September 2019
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1. Module Overview:
This module covers the design and deployment of relational databases in multiuser and web-based environments. It also explores alternative technologies that
are available in the database arena along with scripting languages utilized. The key
issues of database security, legal and ethical issues and security of information and
the incorporation of non-traditional data structures are also introduced.
2. Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this module, you will be able to:
1) Model, design and implement a relational database with a web-based
interface for a specific given case study
2) Review and critically evaluate database technologies.
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3) Assessment types used in this module
Formative Activities & Assessment
Formative Activities and Assessments are opportunities for you to apply, practice
and make sense of the learning materials and content that you have encountered.
These may be an individual task, such as reading some text or watching a video
and documenting your reaction to it, responding to some discussion points on the
discussion forum or participating in a ‘live online classroom’ session. The main
aim of formative activities is that you receive feedback on your contribution which
will help you in preparation for your final module assessment(s). There is
opportunity during the module to engage in formative assessment; this is related
to the summative assessment for the module. As part of this module you will be
advised to complete several aspects of self-assessment following individual
sessions. This will formulate in part a recommended study guide for your
summative assessment.
Summative Assessment
Summative assessments are the pieces of coursework that you complete which
contribute towards your final grade in this module. You should take the feedback
that you receive from the completion of coursework in this module and use it to help
you improve your performance in future assessments.
Summative assessment in this module is two pieces of submitted coursework. You
will be expected to submit your summative assignments via the Turnitin assessment
points on the Assessment page in My Learning section of your module.
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4) Specific Assessment Component Guidelines
Coursework 1

Assessment weighting:
Word count:
50% of the module grade
2000 words equivalence

Submission Deadline Date/Time: Thursday, October 31, 2019 by 2359hrs (UK time)
Provisional Feedback Released: Monday 25th November 2019 by 9AM (UK Time)
Title: Stepping into History
This is an individual assessment worth 50% of the module.
Case Study
‘Stepping into History’ is a fast-growing business that offers the history enthusiast
something a little bit different. Through its website and attendance at various events,
the company promotes the following services and products:
• Guided tours of famous historical sites, buildings and battlefields – across the
world
• Customized expert lectures from world-renowned historians for private functions
• Genealogical research and family tree services – either face-to-face or remotely
• Historical documents and books location service – from across the world
• Historical book sales – from its own on-line book store
• History magazine subscriptions – issued quarterly in hardcopy and e-copy format
• Hands-on training workshops and courses – in historical and archaeological skills
The company needs a database to run the company – your job is to deliver that database. For
each aspect of the business you must identify and capture the relevant data – such as speaker
details, customer details, lecture/visit dates and locations, book details, workshop details etc.
etc.
The above is simply an outline of the company and you will need to make your own
assumptions and interpret or even extend the scenario as you go. Use your imagination as
you see fit but you must clearly document all assumptions and extensions.
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Your Tasks
1. Produce an Entity-Relationship Model for the scenario described above (15 marks)
Develop a top-down design of the data in the form of an entity-relationship diagram. You
should note all assumptions you make about the data and the reasoning behind your design
choices. Also include any appropriate constraints and a list of entity types showing their
attributes and identifiers.
2. Design a set of relations conforming to Boyce-Codd Normal Form (BCNF). (15 marks)
Once you are satisfied that the ER diagram is a good representation of the data, produce a
logical design by mapping the E-R diagram to a set of (normalized) relations. Clearly show all
intermediate steps.
3. Implement your final database design. (15 marks)
Take each of the relations from your relational model and implement them as SQL tables. You
must include all primary and foreign keys as well as any other table or column constraints you
feel are appropriate. Then, using appropriate sample data and your own imagination, populate
your finished tables.
4. Query your database. (20 marks)
Using SQL, write a set of realistic sample queries based on the above scenario (use your
imagination for details of each query) but they should include the following SQL query
techniques:
• Joins (using two, three or more tables)
• Set operations (UNION, INTERSECT and MINUS)
• Ordering
• Grouping
• Aggregate functions (MIN, MAX, AVG, COUNT, SUM)
• Table aliases
• Renaming columns
• Sub-queries (nested queries)
You should aim to write at least ten sample queries – ranging from basic
SELECT…FROM…WHERE queries to more advanced ones using the above techniques.
5. Optimize your Database (10 Marks)
You should now optimize your database:
• Apply suitable database optimization techniques to your final set of tables.
• Aim to implement a range of indexes.
• Run a suite of queries that will invoke those indexes.
• Aim to demonstrate some index suppression techniques.
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6. Secure your Database (10 Marks)
Your optimized database should now be secured. To demonstrate this:
• Create three new users on your database
• Allocate them different security privileges and roles.
• Create a suite of views over your existing base tables.
• Issue appropriate privileges so that at least one user can use those views.
• Clearly demonstrate what actions each user can/cannot perform.
7. Building a Web Interface (15 Marks)
You now have a fully working, secure and optimized database. Your final task is to design and
build a web-based interface to that database such that it can support the following operations:
• Insert new rows of data
• Update existing rows of data
• Delete existing rows of data
• Query existing rows of data
Please read the following guidance…
Important Notes and FAQ’s.
• Make sure your full name and student ID are on the front page of the assessment
• Clearly label all tasks and take care to explain and discuss your technical work
• For the modelling and design work you must supply clearly annotated diagrams
• For the SQL work you must supply full code listings of the inputted code and screenshots of
the outputted results – even if no rows were returned. Each screenshot must include
some identifying feature – such as a username or user ID – that proves beyond doubt
that it is your own work.
• If you need to research, then fully reference all such sources using the Harvard notation
The detailed grading criteria are below…
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Grading Criteria – Coursework 1

70-
100%
(Excellent/Outstanding)
• Fully complete and accurate ER Model that captures all/most semantic aspects of
the case study
• A fully normalized set of BCNF relations with all intermediate steps fully annotated
• A fully populated set of tables that encapsulates all primary & foreign keys plus all
other constraints
• A minimum of ten complex SQL queries that employ joins, grouping and other
advanced techniques
• A rich set of database optimization techniques to include both indexing and
clustering
• A rich set of database security techniques to include all privileges, roles, profiles and
views
• A well-designed web interface that incorporates HCI design principles and various
components
• A minimum of two insert, update and delete operations (each) via this web interface
• A minimum of ten queries (of varying complexity) via this web interface
• All work to be fully evidenced proving beyond doubt who the author of that work is
• All work to be fully annotated, well laid out and easy to follow with suitable headings
• Any external sources are fully referenced by strict adherence to the Harvard citation
standards
60-
69%
(Very Good/Commendable)
• Fully complete and accurate ER Model that captures most semantic aspects of the
case study
• A fully normalized set of BCNF relations with most intermediate steps fullyannotated
• A fully populated set of tables that encapsulates all primary & foreign keys plus other
constraints
• A minimum of eight complex SQL queries that employ joins, grouping & other
advanced techniques
• A rich set of database optimization techniques to include both indexing and
clustering
• A rich set of database security techniques to include many privileges, roles, profiles
and views
• A well-designed web interface that incorporates HCI design principles and various
components
• A minimum of two insert, update and delete operations (each) via this webinterface
• A minimum of eight queries (of varying complexity) via this web interface
• All work to be fully evidenced proving beyond doubt who the author of that work is
• All work to be fully annotated, well laid out and easy to follow with suitable headings
• Any external sources are fully referenced by strict adherence to the Harvard citation
standards
50-
59%
(Good/Highly Competent)
• Mostly complete and accurate ER Model that captures many semantic aspects of
the case study
• A largely normalized set of BCNF relations with many intermediate steps fully
annotated
• A fully populated set of tables that encapsulates some primary & foreign keys and
other constraints
• A minimum of five complex SQL queries that employ joins, grouping and other
advanced techniques
• A rich set of database optimization techniques to include either Indexing or
clustering
• A rich set of database security techniques to include a few privileges, roles, profiles
and views

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• A basic web interface that incorporates some HCI design principles & perhaps
various components
• A minimum of one insert, update and delete operations (each) via this webinterface
• A minimum of five queries (of varying complexity) via this web interface
• All work to be fully evidenced proving beyond doubt who the author of that work is
• Most work to be fully annotated, well laid out and easy to follow with suitable
headings
• Any external sources are fully referenced by strict adherence to the Harvard citation
standards
40-
49%
(Satisfactory/Competent)
• A very basic ER Model that captures only some semantic aspects of the casestudy
• A partly normalized set of BCNF relations with no/little annotation
• A barely populated set of tables that encapsulates only primary and/or foreign keys
• A minimum of three simple SQL queries that employ no advanced techniques
• A very basic set of database optimization techniques – perhaps only simple indexing
• A very basic set of database security techniques to include any aspect
• A very basic web interface that incorporates no serious HCI design principles
• A minimum of one insert, update and delete operations (each) via this webinterface
• A minimum of three simple queries via this web interface
• All work to be fully evidenced proving beyond doubt who the author of that work is
• Work is presented in a very basic (but readable) state
• Most external sources are fully referenced by adequate adherence to the Harvard
citation standards
35-
39%
(Unsatisfactory)
• A very basic ER Model that captures only small semantic aspects of the casestudy
• A very basic set of relations with no/little annotation or serious attempt at
normalization
• A barely populated set of tables that encapsulates only primary and/or foreign keys
• A minimum of three simple SQL queries that employ no advanced techniques
• A very basic set of database optimization techniques – perhaps only simple indexing
• A very basic set of database security techniques to include any aspect
• A very basic web interface that incorporates no serious HCI design principles
• A minimum of one insert, update and delete operations (each) via this webinterface
• A minimum of one simple query via this web interface
• Some work to be fully evidenced proving beyond doubt who the author of that work
is
• Work is presented in a very basic (but readable) state
• Many external sources are NOT referenced by any adherence to the Harvard
citation standards
1-34%(Very Poor/Nothing of Merit)
• A very basic (or absent) ER Model that captures only small semantic aspects of the
case study
• A very basic (or absent) set of relations with no /little annotation or serious attempt
at normalization
• A barely populated set of tables that encapsulates only primary and/or foreign keys
• A minimum of three simple SQL queries that employ no advanced techniques
• No database optimization or security work
• No web interface at all
• No hard evidence proving beyond doubt who the author of that work is
• Work is presented in a very basic (but readable) state
• No attempt is made to reference any cited sources

End of Assessment 1
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Coursework 2

Assessment weighting:
Word count:
50% of the module grade
2000 words

Submission Deadline Date/Time: Thursday, December 05, 2019 by 2359hrs (UK Time)
Provisional Feedback Released: Monday, January06, 2020 by 0900hrs (UK Time)
Assessment
This is an individual assessment worth 50% of the module.
Your Tasks
Write a 2000-word report on alternative and complementary technologies to be used in the
deployment of the database implementation from Assessment 1, in order to fully exploit the
corporate data assets. Security, ethical and legal issues should also be considered.
Specifically, you should address the following technical areas:
1. Data Warehousing and the difference between operational and strategic data sets
2. Data Mining and OLAP (On-Line Analytical Processing) compared with OLTP
Systems
3. The rise of ‘Big Data’ and its applications
4. ‘NoSQL’ databases as compared with ‘ACID-compliant’ databases
5. The impact of the ‘Open Data’ movement
Important Notes and FAQ’s
• Make sure your full name and student ID are on the front page of the assessment
• Clearly label and number all sections and sub-sections of your report
• Have an accurate contents page at the front and a full reference list at the rear
• Place a word count at the end of the report
• Try and incorporate good-quality diagrams into your discussion
• Fully reference all sources using the Harvard notation
• Each technical area carries equal weight – 20 marks each
• For each technical area, cover the following points:
• Describe the essential concepts involved in that technology
• Explain the key advantages and benefits of that technology
• Describe specific real-world applications and users of that technology
• Explain any disadvantages or situations were that technology would be unsuitable
The detailed grading criteria are over the page…
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Grading Criteria

70-100% (Excellent/Outstanding)
• All five technology areas are fully explained and analyzed with many excellent
examples/applications
• Many high-quality diagrams are employed to support the key concepts discussed
in the report
• The data security, ethical and legal aspects are fully explained, analyzed and
placed within context
• The report is presented to a very high standard, logically sequenced with no
spelling or other errors
• At least 15 quality external sources are cited within the report
• All external sources are fully cited and referenced by strict adherence to the
Harvard standard
60-69% (Very Good/Commendable)
• All five technology areas are well explained and analyzed with some excellent
examples/applications
• Some high-quality diagrams are employed to support the key concepts discussed
in the report
• The data security, ethical and legal aspects are well explained, analyzed and
placed within context
• The report is presented to a high standard, logically sequenced with no spelling
or other errors
• At least 12 quality external sources are cited within the report
• All external sources are fully cited and referenced by strict adherence to the
Harvard standard
50-59% (Good/Highly Competent)
• Most technology areas are well explained and analyzed with some excellent
examples/applications
• Some high-quality diagrams are employed to support the key concepts discussed
in the report
• The data security, ethical and legal aspects are adequately explained and
analyzed
• The report is presented to a good standard, logically sequenced with few spelling
or other errors
• At least 10 quality external sources are cited within the report
• All external sources are fully cited and referenced by strict adherence to the
Harvard standard
40-49% (Satisfactory/Competent)
• Most technology areas are explained and analyzed to some degree
• Possibly one or more diagrams are employed to support the key concepts
discussed in the report
• The data security, ethical and legal aspects are explained and analyzed in a very
superficial manner
• The report is presented to a basic (but readable) standard
• At least 7 quality external sources are cited within the report
• All external sources are fully cited and referenced by reasonable adherence to
the Harvard standard

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35-39% (Unsatisfactory)
• Most technology areas are NOT explained and analyzed to any serious degree
• No diagrams are employed to support the key concepts discussed in the report
• The data security, ethical and legal aspects are very poorly explained and
analyzed (if at all)
• The report is presented to a very basic (but readable) standard, possibly with
spelling errors
• Fewer than 5 quality external sources are cited within the report
• Few external sources are cited and referenced by any adherence to the Harvard
standard
1-34% (Very Poor/Nothing of Merit)
• Most technology areas are NOT explained and analyzed to any meaningful
degree
• No diagrams are employed to support the key concepts discussed in the report
• The data security, ethical and legal aspects are very poorly explained and
analyzed (if at all)
• The report is presented to a very basic (but readable) standard, with many errors
and mistakes
• Fewer than 3 quality external sources are cited within the report
• There is no use of the Harvard system

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5) Assessment Presentation
When marking this assignment, the academics will also be looking for the following
criteria:
• Clear legible presentation.
• Good use of spelling, grammar and language throughout.
• Appropriate focus, meeting learning outcomes/assignment criteria.
• Logical progression and structure of arguments.
• (Normally) an introduction, a welldeveloped discussion and a conclusio
n summarizing the work.
• The introduction will include an exploration of the focus of the assignment
and discuss the way the assignment has been approached.
• Evidence of a range of relevant supporting reading.
• Use of accurate, evidence based information to support the arguments made.
• Follow normal Academic Regulations in terms of Academic Offences, style
and language.
• Use the Harvard system of referencing and may include a bibliography that
lists all resources referenced.
• A declaration statement which says you have checked your Turnitin
originality report and certain that the work is your own (and has never been
submitted for marking before by you, or anyone else)
• Maintain the confidentiality of clients/customers and persons associated with
them, colleagues and organizations
This module uses a grading scale applicable to Levels 6 in the University Credit Framework.
The grade descriptors (see Contextualised grading rubric on the next page) are typical
characteristics of the standard of work associated with each grade, and are given in details
by level.
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6) Assessment regulations
The standard University assessment regulations apply for this assessment. Please note that
in line with the University common assessment regulations, failure to submit coursework (i.e.
non-submission) could lead to you failing the module.
Details of assessment regulations are available at:
https://www.derby.ac.uk/about/organisation/academic-regulations/ (sections F and E).
Work Submitted late, will be marked according to University regulation, please see the
University guidance on Late Submissions.
This module uses a grading scale applicable to Levels 5, 6 and 7 in the University Credit
Framework. The grade descriptors (on the next page) are typical characteristics of the
standard of work associated with each grade.
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Level 5,6 and 7 Grade Descriptor

% mark Mark DescriptorsClass
70-100% Excellent
Outstanding; high to very high standard; a high level of critical analysis and
evaluation, inclusive original thinking; commendable originality;
exceptionally well coherence and logic. Trivial or very minor errors. For
the highest marks (90-100%): an exceptional standard of work illustrating
thorough and in-depth understanding, communicated with exceptional
authority.
First
60-69% Very Good
A very good standard; a very good level of critical analysis and evaluation;
significant originality; well researched; a very good standard of
presentation; commendable clarity of ideas; thoughtful and effective
presentation; very good sense of coherence and logic; minor errors only.
Second
Div 1
50-59% Good
A good standard; a fairly good level of critical analysis and evaluation;
some evidence of original thinking or originality; quite well researched; a
good standard of presentation; ideas generally clear and coherent, some
evidence of misunderstandings; some deficiencies in presentation.
Second
Div 2
40-49% Satisfactory
A sound standard of work; a fair level of critical analysis and evaluation;
little evidence of original thinking of originality; adequately researched; a
sound standard of presentation; ideas fairly clear and coherent, some
significant misunderstandings and errors; some weakness in style or
presentation but satisfactory overall.
Third
35-39% Unsatisfactory
Overall marginally unsatisfactory; some sound aspects but some of the
following weakness are evident; inadequate critical analysis and
evaluation; little evidence of originality; not well researched; standard
presentation unacceptable; ideas are unclear and incoherent; some
significant errors and misunderstandings. Marginal fail.
Marginal
Fail
21-34% Poor
Below the pass standard; a poor critical analysis and evaluation, virtually
no evidence of originality; poorly researched; presentation unacceptable
and not up to graduate standard; ideas confused and incoherent, some
serious misunderstandings and errors. A clear fail, short and pass
standard.
1-20% Very Poor
Well below the pass standard, with many serious errors. Standard of
presentation totally unacceptable, incoherent and may be severely under
length. No evidence of evaluation or application. A very clear fail, well
short of the pass standard.
Fail
NS Non-submission
No work has been submitted.
Z Academic offence notation
Applies to proven instances academic offence.

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7) Where to get other help to do your assessment
During the course of the module your tutor will offer you a range of help and support. There
are contact details for them within the module.
Other colleagues will offer help and guidance on the Student Portal.
In addition, the Academic Administrators will post helpful notices on your module
announcement board.
You could also use the following links if you want extra help with:
Referencing and avoiding making an academic offence
Study Skills

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